TEPCO Signs LNG Purchase Deal With BP

via naturalgasasia.com / Septmeber 12, 2014 / Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) and BP Singapore (BPS), an affiliate of BP Group have signed an agreement under which the Japanese utility will purchase up to 1.20 million tons of LNG per year over 17 years from the British firm. LNG supplies are expected to commence in April 2017 and the gas would be sourced from multiple sources the BP holds, TEPCO … Continue reading

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J-gov unveils nuclear centered draft energy policy

by Mari Yamaguchi / via JapanToday / February 26, 2014 / Japan unveiled its first draft energy policy since the Fukushima meltdowns three years ago, saying nuclear power remains an important source of electricity for the country. The draft presented Tuesday to the cabinet for approval expected in March, said Japan’s nuclear energy dependency will be reduced as much as possible, but that reactors meeting new safety standards set after … Continue reading

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Japan still counting Fukushima energy cost

via World Nuclear News /  January 27, 2014 / Costly fossil fuel imports have helped push Japan into a trade deficit for a third consecutive year as the country’s nuclear plants remain off line. Preliminary 2013 figures released by Japan’s Ministry of Finance reveal a deficit of JPY 11.5 trillion ($112 billion), up 65% on 2012′s deficit of 6.9 trillion ($67.5 billion). A major contributing factor has been the cost … Continue reading

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Coal-fired power plants to be built in Fukushima

via Voice of Russia / November 30, 2013 / Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) announced its intention to build two advanced coal-fired power plants in Fukushima. Company officials claim that the new power plants will help the region recover after the nuclear disaster. TEPCO promises that the new construction project will help fight unemployment by creating two thousand jobs and a source of cheap energy. The intended capacity of the … Continue reading

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Germany’s Clean Energy Push: What Can the World Learn

Can Germany Lead California To Energy Freedom?

Germany’s Clean Energy Push: What Can the World Learn

Register Now
Live, Free Webinar*

Tue, Jul 9, 2013 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM EDT

Known as the Energiewende, or “energy transition“, Germany’s campaign to move to renewable power is ambitious, massively popular at home, and by many accounts, quite successful. With 25% of Germany’s electricity currently being sourced from solar, wind, and biomass generation and a target of 80% renewable by 2050 in place, the German energy economy is worth watching.

What can the rest of Europe, the U.S., and other nations learn from one wealthy nation’s aggressive clean energy push? Will Germany succeed in meeting its goals? Which are its biggest obstacles? And perhaps most importantly, can other nations replicate Germany’s most positive achievements? Join us as we ask:

– What distinguishes Germany in terms of economics or political will that has made energiewende possible? Which nations have similar qualities?
– What has been Germany’s most successful strategy in cleaning up its energy mix?
– Is the decision to eliminate nuclear power after the Fukushima event consistent with Germany’s goals?
– What could prevent other nations from adopting similar strategies?

Featuring:

– Rainer Baake:
Director of Agora-Energiewende, former Deputy Minister of the German Federal Environmental Ministry

– Dr. Sören Buttkereit:
Vice President of regulatory strategies for Siemens Energy, focused on market design in the power sector and the adaptations required for a successful transition towards systems with a higher share of (intermittent) renewables.

– Stephanie Wang
Regulatory Policy Director for the Clean Coalition, a nonprofit working to encourage a modern energy system of smaller-scale, efficient, renewable energy projects.

– Jesse Jenkins, Moderator:
MIT Energy Initiative Energy Fellow and Community Manager at The Energy Collective, former Director of Energy and Climate Policy at the Breakthrough Instituteenergiewende possible? Which nations have similar qualities?

What has been Germany’s most successful strategy in cleaning up its energy mix?

Is the decision to eliminate nuclear power after the Fukushima event consistent with Germany’s goals?

What could prevent other nations from adopting similar strategies?

  * https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1354509616397857280?source=tec_blast1&inf_contact_key=bb8ec0d2ea0a237eb8db11a840ff3a5b2b1aa31b33e32499f4be8f4cc0c4aaa2

Aging Nuke Plants On Fault Lines In Tsunami Hazard Zones = Fukushimas… Any Questions?
PLEASE Turn off a light for Fukushima USA / San Onofre

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